How The Internet Changed The Makeup Industry Forever

Georgina Jones
| Contributing Writer | 4 hours ago

How The Internet Changed The Makeup Industry Forever

The Debrief: Beauty inspo is moving away from the catwalks and towards social media

A life before Kylie Jenner’s branded liquid lipsticks seems like aeons ago. Since the launch of her cosmetics back in November 2015, the make-up industry has entered into a desperate race to keep up with the competition. Big brands have been anxiously trying to catch up with their online, independent rivals, with the bar being set by social media stars, their accompanying makeup lines and collaborations and their avid, active followers. 

Just a few years ago trends were dictated from within the make-up industry itself. They were seeded out at catwalk shows, where big brands had a hold of the backstage beauty arena. The trends were replicated for adverts and disseminated through magazines. But, this is no more. Now, the public turn to YouTube beauty gurus for recommendations and spot trends, like faux freckles, on their Instagram Explore page. We no longer need to rely on the media or make-up brands to find out what’s hot and what’s not.

In fact, these big brands have been forced to collaborate with internet sensations in order to sell products and remain relevant. Just a few years ago, it was unthinkable that Too Faced would bring out a palette not only influenced by, but made in collaboration with a Netherlands-born YouTuber

Nikkie Tutorials’ The Power of Makeup palette with Too Faced is far from a one-off either: Tarte Cosmetics brought out a palette with Swamp Queen; Instagram star James Charles became the first “Cover Boy” for CoverGirl; Manny MUA and Patrick Starr launched a full collection with Morphe Brushes – the collaborations are endless. And while these stars thrive off of their lines with established brands, they’ve also made space for more independent cosmetics businesses than ever.

One of the most successful users of the internet to make a career in the beauty industry comes in the form of a skinny pink-haired sensation. For some younger fans, Jeffree Star is only known to them as a makeup mogul and YouTuber, for the rest of us, he was MySpace famous long before he brought out his first liquid lipstick. 

His internet fame was reliant on his bright pink hair, androgynous aesthetic and a music career that scene queens and emo kids totally adored. Although a controversial character with many (videos have surfaced of some very problematic and offensive comments and behaviour) , Star knew how to work the online world to his favour and make a career out of it. In the time since, he’s turned his fame into one of the most successful independent makeup lines out there. 

The rise of indie brands like Lime Crime, Jeffree Star Cosmetics and more have impacted the industry so much that other lines are struggling to keep up. While the likes of MAC have a strong enough cultural image to stay in the competition, brands like L’Oreal don’t pull in the profits like they used to

While this could be for a number of reasons, it can’t be coincidental that its’ occurred just as there has been a rise in independent and influencer endorsed brands. It seems that a celebrity or model name isn’t enough anymore, but spokespeople for these makeup lines must be internet savvy too. Not just that, but those who have found their fame online are more influential than ever. Another case in point: Last year Estee Lauder saw sales slip even with supermodel and it girl Kendall Jenner fronting their campaigns. 

To keep up, CoverGirl took the leap to introduce their first ‘Cover Boy‘ with Instagram user James Charles. Shortly after, Maybelline followed up with their first male ambassador MannyMUA. This doesn’t just come as a step forward for an internet influenced culture that is represented, but a diverse one too. With both brands taking the leap to use male figures in their campaigns for the first time ever, it seems as though the internet’s impact on the mainstream makeup world is having a positive effect for minorities just as much as it allows for a majority ruling – based on followers and internet popularity – on who people want to represent them in this industry. 

If brands aren’t setting the trends, but following them based on what is the most popular online, then the independent consumer wins. What we like on Instagram turns into who we see in adverts and who influences new products in the market. While incidents like James Charles’ racist remarks show that it isn’t always a promising idea to pluck someone from IRL obscurity, the sense of independence, choice and diversity found URL still stands strong. 

The proof remains that anyone can make it in the beauty industry, regardless of race, weight, gender and sexuality – from being perpetuated by an internet culture, the influence has gone from our Instagram feeds into the real world. 

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Article source: http://www.thedebrief.co.uk/style/hair-and-beauty/how-the-internet-changed-the-makeup-industry-forever-20170366880

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Millennial Vanity Fills Clothing-Shaped Void

Shopping malls are getting a freshen up — with a coat of lipstick. 

Millennials’ love of digital media, and desire to look their best in their selfies, is fueling a beauty boom in the U.S. and Europe. Ironically, this is driving demand for physical stores where makeup junkies can get their fix.

But those companies seeking to benefit from this trend should take care. Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but there’s nothing attractive about over-expansion followed by expensive retrenchment.

More health and beauty shops opened in 2016 than any other type of retailer in Europe, according to property consultants CBRE. The most active included specialist brands such as Kiko Milano, Rituals and Aesop, as well as L’Oreal SA’s NYX, a range of professional cosmetics at affordable prices, and its edgy Urban Decay line.

It’s a similar picture in the U.S. Ulta Beauty Inc. said it would open 100 new stores across the country, while Sephora, already the nation’s number-one seller of perfumes and cosmetics, is also continuing to expand. And E.l.f. Beauty Inc., which started as an online retailer in 2004 and went public last September, plans to open brick-and-mortar locations.

The big cosmetics names are muscling in around the world, selling direct to consumers through their own stores.  L’Oreal doesn’t disclose the total size of its store base, although it did say recently that it opened close to 200 shops across its cosmetic lines (excluding the Body Shop). It’s a similar picture at Estee Lauder Cos., which is also building out its physical presence.

The push for new shopfronts makes sense, given gains in the makeup market. For every dollar U.S. shoppers spent at department stores they shelled out $2.30 at health and beauty locations. 

The trend is not just confined to the U.S. Around the world, women are choosing to spend more of their money on cosmetics.

Big names get control over their interaction with consumers by opening their own locations. That’s wise when U.S department stores and European supermarkets are engaged in ferocious discounting — not the best environment to educate shoppers about the latest online trends, and encourage them to buy.

But there’s another factor driving the expansion: supply.

In the U.S., many department stores and clothing retailers are shrinking their store bases. In Asia, as some luxury brands shutter shops, there are opportunities for beauty companies to move in. And in Europe, while some clothing lines are still expanding, they’re being selective about new locations.

Its easy to see why mall owners want to attract more makeup: cosmetics companies operate in one of the few growth areas of the market, and crucially, they are still prepared to expand through the addition of new outlets. They also tend to have fatter margins, so are more able to pay premium rents.

But beauty brands should proceed with caution.

The history of retail is littered with tales of over-expansion: think British supermarkets, and now potentially food and beverage outlets. The Body Shop, owned by L’Oreal, has about 3,000 stores. It is now selling the chain, and any purchaser is likely to cull locations.

There’s also a risk of oversupply if fashion retailers pile in. Hennes Mauritz AB and Associated British Foods Plc’s Primark have introduced beauty ranges.

Finally, operating physical stores involves extra costs from staff to property taxes, and unless carefully managed, could put pressure on margins.  

Jean-Paul Agon, chief executive officer of L’Oreal, said recently he’s aware of the perils of both over-expansion, and letting store costs escalate. He and his rivals should be. While mall operators see cosmetics as a bonanza, for the makeup sellers, too much new space could turn this beauty boom ugly. 

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the authors of this story:
Andrea Felsted in London at afelsted@bloomberg.net
Shelly Banjo in New York at sbanjo@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Jennifer Ryan at jryan13@bloomberg.net

Article source: https://www.bloomberg.com/gadfly/articles/2017-03-24/makeup-mavens-meet-selfie-snappers-in-shopfront-surge

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Millennial Vanity Fills Clothing-Shaped Void – Bloomberg Gadfly

Shopping malls are getting a freshen up — with a coat of lipstick. 

Millennials’ love of digital media, and desire to look their best in their selfies, is fueling a beauty boom in the U.S. and Europe. Ironically, this is driving demand for physical stores where makeup junkies can get their fix.

But those companies seeking to benefit from this trend should take care. Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but there’s nothing attractive about over-expansion followed by expensive retrenchment.

More health and beauty shops opened in 2016 than any other type of retailer in Europe, according to property consultants CBRE. The most active included specialist brands such as Kiko Milano, Rituals and Aesop, as well as L’Oreal SA’s NYX, a range of professional cosmetics at affordable prices, and its edgy Urban Decay line.

It’s a similar picture in the U.S. Ulta Beauty Inc. said it would open 100 new stores across the country, while Sephora, already the nation’s number-one seller of perfumes and cosmetics, is also continuing to expand. And E.l.f. Beauty Inc., which started as an online retailer in 2004 and went public last September, plans to open brick-and-mortar locations.

The big cosmetics names are muscling in around the world, selling direct to consumers through their own stores.  L’Oreal doesn’t disclose the total size of its store base, although it did say recently that it opened close to 200 shops across its cosmetic lines (excluding the Body Shop). It’s a similar picture at Estee Lauder Cos., which is also building out its physical presence.

The push for new shopfronts makes sense, given gains in the makeup market. For every dollar U.S. shoppers spent at department stores they shelled out $2.30 at health and beauty locations. 

The trend is not just confined to the U.S. Around the world, women are choosing to spend more of their money on cosmetics.

Big names get control over their interaction with consumers by opening their own locations. That’s wise when U.S department stores and European supermarkets are engaged in ferocious discounting — not the best environment to educate shoppers about the latest online trends, and encourage them to buy.

But there’s another factor driving the expansion: supply.

In the U.S., many department stores and clothing retailers are shrinking their store bases. In Asia, as some luxury brands shutter shops, there are opportunities for beauty companies to move in. And in Europe, while some clothing lines are still expanding, they’re being selective about new locations.

Its easy to see why mall owners want to attract more makeup: cosmetics companies operate in one of the few growth areas of the market, and crucially, they are still prepared to expand through the addition of new outlets. They also tend to have fatter margins, so are more able to pay premium rents.

But beauty brands should proceed with caution.

The history of retail is littered with tales of over-expansion: think British supermarkets, and now potentially food and beverage outlets. The Body Shop, owned by L’Oreal, has about 3,000 stores. It is now selling the chain, and any purchaser is likely to cull locations.

There’s also a risk of oversupply if fashion retailers pile in. Hennes Mauritz AB and Associated British Foods Plc’s Primark have introduced beauty ranges.

Finally, operating physical stores involves extra costs from staff to property taxes, and unless carefully managed, could put pressure on margins.  

Jean-Paul Agon, chief executive officer of L’Oreal, said recently he’s aware of the perils of both over-expansion, and letting store costs escalate. He and his rivals should be. While mall operators see cosmetics as a bonanza, for the makeup sellers, too much new space could turn this beauty boom ugly. 

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the authors of this story:
Andrea Felsted in London at afelsted@bloomberg.net
Shelly Banjo in New York at sbanjo@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Jennifer Ryan at jryan13@bloomberg.net

Article source: https://www.bloomberg.com/gadfly/articles/2017-03-24/makeup-mavens-meet-selfie-snappers-in-shopfront-surge

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Selfie Snappers Stoke Shopfront Surge – Bloomberg Gadfly

Shopping malls are getting a freshen up — with a coat of lipstick. 

Millennials’ love of digital media, and desire to look their best in their selfies, is fueling a beauty boom in the U.S. and Europe. Ironically, this is driving demand for physical stores where makeup junkies can get their fix.

But those companies seeking to benefit from this trend should take care. Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but there’s nothing attractive about over-expansion followed by expensive retrenchment.

More health and beauty shops opened in 2016 than any other type of retailer in Europe, according to property consultants CBRE. The most active included specialist brands such as Kiko Milano, Rituals and Aesop, as well as L’Oreal SA’s NYX, a range of professional cosmetics at affordable prices, and its edgy Urban Decay line.

It’s a similar picture in the U.S. Ulta Beauty Inc. said it would open 100 new stores across the country, while Sephora, already the nation’s number-one seller of perfumes and cosmetics, is also continuing to expand. And E.l.f. Beauty Inc., which started as an online retailer in 2004 and went public last September, plans to open brick-and-mortar locations.

The big cosmetics names are muscling in around the world, selling direct to consumers through their own stores.  L’Oreal doesn’t disclose the total size of its store base, although it did say recently that it opened close to 200 shops across its cosmetic lines (excluding the Body Shop). It’s a similar picture at Estee Lauder Cos., which is also building out its physical presence.

The push for new shopfronts makes sense, given gains in the makeup market. For every dollar U.S. shoppers spent at department stores they shelled out $2.30 at health and beauty locations. 

The trend is not just confined to the U.S. Around the world, women are choosing to spend more of their money on cosmetics.

Big names get control over their interaction with consumers by opening their own locations. That’s wise when U.S department stores and European supermarkets are engaged in ferocious discounting — not the best environment to educate shoppers about the latest online trends, and encourage them to buy.

But there’s another factor driving the expansion: supply.

In the U.S., many department stores and clothing retailers are shrinking their store bases. In Asia, as some luxury brands shutter shops, there are opportunities for beauty companies to move in. And in Europe, while some clothing lines are still expanding, they’re being selective about new locations.

Its easy to see why mall owners want to attract more makeup: cosmetics companies operate in one of the few growth areas of the market, and crucially, they are still prepared to expand through the addition of new outlets. They also tend to have fatter margins, so are more able to pay premium rents.

But beauty brands should proceed with caution.

The history of retail is littered with tales of over-expansion: think British supermarkets, and now potentially food and beverage outlets. The Body Shop, owned by L’Oreal, has about 3,000 stores. It is now selling the chain, and any purchaser is likely to cull locations.

There’s also a risk of oversupply if fashion retailers pile in. Hennes Mauritz AB and Associated British Foods Plc’s Primark have introduced beauty ranges.

Finally, operating physical stores involves extra costs from staff to property taxes, and unless carefully managed, could put pressure on margins.  

Jean-Paul Agon, chief executive officer of L’Oreal, said recently he’s aware of the perils of both over-expansion, and letting store costs escalate. He and his rivals should be. While mall operators see cosmetics as a bonanza, for the makeup sellers, too much new space could turn this beauty boom ugly. 

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the authors of this story:
Andrea Felsted in London at afelsted@bloomberg.net
Shelly Banjo in New York at sbanjo@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Jennifer Ryan at jryan13@bloomberg.net

Article source: https://www.bloomberg.com/gadfly/articles/2017-03-24/makeup-mavens-meet-selfie-snappers-in-shopfront-surge

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Selfie Snappers Stoke Shopfront Surge

Shopping malls are getting a freshen up — with a coat of lipstick. 

Millennials’ love of digital media, and desire to look their best in their selfies, is fueling a beauty boom in the U.S. and Europe. Ironically, this is driving demand for physical stores where makeup junkies can get their fix.

But those companies seeking to benefit from this trend should take care. Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but there’s nothing attractive about over-expansion followed by expensive retrenchment.

More health and beauty shops opened in 2016 than any other type of retailer in Europe, according to property consultants CBRE. The most active included specialist brands such as Kiko Milano, Rituals and Aesop, as well as L’Oreal SA’s NYX, a range of professional cosmetics at affordable prices, and its edgy Urban Decay line.

It’s a similar picture in the U.S. Ulta Beauty Inc. said it would open 100 new stores across the country, while Sephora, already the nation’s number-one seller of perfumes and cosmetics, is also continuing to expand. And E.l.f. Beauty Inc., which started as an online retailer in 2004 and went public last September, plans to open brick-and-mortar locations.

The big cosmetics names are muscling in around the world, selling direct to consumers through their own stores.  L’Oreal doesn’t disclose the total size of its store base, although it did say recently that it opened close to 200 shops across its cosmetic lines (excluding the Body Shop). It’s a similar picture at Estee Lauder Cos., which is also building out its physical presence.

The push for new shopfronts makes sense, given gains in the makeup market. For every dollar U.S. shoppers spent at department stores they shelled out $2.30 at health and beauty locations. 

The trend is not just confined to the U.S. Around the world, women are choosing to spend more of their money on cosmetics.

Big names get control over their interaction with consumers by opening their own locations. That’s wise when U.S department stores and European supermarkets are engaged in ferocious discounting — not the best environment to educate shoppers about the latest online trends, and encourage them to buy.

But there’s another factor driving the expansion: supply.

In the U.S., many department stores and clothing retailers are shrinking their store bases. In Asia, as some luxury brands shutter shops, there are opportunities for beauty companies to move in. And in Europe, while some clothing lines are still expanding, they’re being selective about new locations.

Its easy to see why mall owners want to attract more makeup: they operate in one of the few growth areas of the market, and crucially, they are still prepared to expand through the addition of new outlets. They also tend to have fatter margins, so are more able to pay premium rents.

But cosmetics sellers should proceed with caution.

The history of retail is littered with tales of over-expansion: think British supermarkets, and now potentially food and beverage outlets. The Body Shop, owned by L’Oreal, has about 3,000 stores. It is now selling the chain, and any purchaser is likely to cull locations.

There’s also a risk of oversupply if fashion retailers pile in. Hennes Mauritz AB and Associated British Foods Plc’s Primark have introduced beauty ranges.

Finally, operating physical stores involves extra costs from staff to property taxes, and unless carefully managed, could put pressure on margins.  

Jean-Paul Agon, chief executive officer of L’Oreal, said recently he’s aware of the perils of both over-expansion, and letting store costs escalate. He and his rivals should be. While mall operators see cosmetics as a bonanza, for the makeup sellers, too much new space could turn this beauty boom ugly. 

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the authors of this story:
Andrea Felsted in London at afelsted@bloomberg.net
Shelly Banjo in New York at sbanjo@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Jennifer Ryan at jryan13@bloomberg.net

Article source: https://www.bloomberg.com/gadfly/articles/2017-03-24/makeup-mavens-meet-selfie-snappers-in-shopfront-surge

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The Latest Acquisition Targets Are Indie Beauty Brands

More than half a century ago, Revlon founder Charles Revson famously described the true business of cosmetics makers: “We sell hope.” Today the same could be said about what the large, established beauty houses see in small, social media-driven makeup companies. The prospect of wooing the millions of millennials who base their makeup and skin-care purchase decisions on online likes, follows, and reviews from influencers has sparked a feeding frenzy for small, hip brands. The 52 acquisitions in the beauty and personal-care industry last year were the most in a decade, and some of the hottest targets were private brands with massive social media fan bases, according to investment bank Financo LLC.

If there’s any slowdown this year, it’ll only be because demand for buyout candidates outstrips supply, says Colin Welch, a managing director at TSG Consumer Partners LLC, which bought a minority stake in a little line called IT Cosmetics in 2012. The company reached sales of $182 million last year, when TSG orchestrated its sale to L’Oréal SA for $1.2 billion. “There’s a lot of capital chasing investments,” says Welch.

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Big cosmetics companies used to turn up their noses at any acquisition with less than $100 million in annual sales, says Vennette Ho, a managing director at Financo. Now there’s practically no bottom because revenue can climb fast if a line suddenly catches digital fire. That’s because millennials and teens are so receptive to social media tips on what to buy, and because word-of-mouth is the primary factor behind as much as 50 percent of their purchasing decisions, according to McKinsey Co.

These days, “consumers are gravitating to smaller brands with innovation,” Ho says. They also want what’s called “authenticity,” which roughly translates into an interesting backstory from a photogenic founder who applies the personal touch. At Huda Beauty, founder Huda Kattan, an Iraqi American who lives in Dubai, stars in video tutorials demonstrating how to use her latest products; she also answers questions from customers on her blog, beginning her responses with “Hey honey.” Her Instagram followers exceed 18 million.

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“Authenticity is what makes it work,” says Claudia Soare, president of Anastasia Beverly Hills, the celebrity salon empire her mother, Anastasia Soare, founded in 1997. Started in a rented room in Los Angeles, Anastasia now operates Brow Studios in 80 Nordstrom stores nationwide.

Anastasia Beverly Hills—a favorite of many A-listers, including Kim Kardashian—saw its U.S. online sales grow by an industry-leading 150 percent in 2016. What’s more, it’s No. 1 in social media value in the sector, as calculated by Tribe Dynamics, an internet branding company that tracks tweets and retweets, YouTube hits, and more to determine the coolest of the cool. One measure is Instagram followers: Anastasia has more than 13 million.

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That performance has put the company on the wish lists of many mergers-and-acquisitions professionals. But Anastasia Soare is having none of it, saying she regularly rebuffs suitors and doesn’t plan to stop. “We don’t need to answer to anybody,” she says. One reason for the aversion to selling out: “The minute you introduce a financial backer,” says daughter Claudia, “we’ll never be able to deliver the same kind of feeling. The original brand will get diluted. It’s inevitable.”

Private equity firms and big beauty conglomerates aren’t likely to stop trying to snap up small fry, however. “The beauty companies have become extremely acquisitive because their portfolio brands have been tired and dated,” says Ryan Craig, a partner at Bertram Capital Management LLC, which last year sold a majority stake in Paula’s Choice, a skin-care and cosmetics maker, to TA Associates Management LP, a Boston-based private equity firm. “That has left an opportunity for a lot of small, nimble brands to attract younger consumers because they offer something new.” One example: Shiseido Co., Asia’s largest cosmetics maker, in January acquired MatchCo, a 10-employee outfit that developed a smartphone app which scans a person’s skin tone to formulate a customized makeup foundation.

Article source: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/latest-acquisition-targets-indie-beauty-170055332.html

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Tom Pecheux Talks About His New Role at Yves Saint Laurent Beauty

You’d be hard-pressed to find a nicer, more genuine person in the fashion industry than Tom Pecheux. Infectiously charming and perpetually smiling, the makeup artist is beloved by photographers, celebrities, and beauty editors alike, with models literally fighting to make it into his chair backstage at fashion shows. So when it was announced back in January that he landed the coveted position of global beauty director for Yves Saint Laurent Beauty, I couldn’t think of someone more deserving of such an esteemed role. Plus, it makes so much sense: You’ve probably never met someone more quintessentially French than Tom Pecheux. I mean, the guy started out as a pastry chef.

His story has been told many times so I’ll sum it up quickly: While training as a pastry chef in France he quickly realized that he didn’t want to make food for people he would never see or meet (Pecheux is the definition of a people person). While hanging out at a Parisian nightclub, he met a girl who was a makeup artist and it gave him the idea to enroll in beauty school, where he was promptly kicked out of class for applying makeup with his fingers, just the way he saw his mother do it as a kid. Well, jokes on them. Pecheux then began assisting Linda Cantello and eventually rose up the ranks to become one of the most sought after makeup artists in the fashion industry in his own right. All the while applying makeup with his fingers.

Joining YSL Beauty is somewhat of a homecoming for Pecheux, who spent nine years as the creative director at Shiseido, which brought him to Asia four-to-five months of the year, and the next five years as the creative director at Estée Lauder, where he worked primarily in the U.S. “It’s incredible to be back working in France because that’s where I started,” Pecheux told me one rainy morning during Paris Fashion Week when we sat down to chat about his new position. “My first contract was actually with a small French company called Gemey that was owned by L’Oréal and sold at drugstores. It was similar to Bourjois, except Bourjois was doing well and Gemey was dying. I left — because I was already pretentious and hoping for something bigger — and then they were bought by Maybelline. So maybe in hindsight I should of stayed,” he joked.

It was the end of his Estée Lauder contract, and his willingness to work with up-and-coming talent, that helped him get to this place. When a relatively unknown French designer by the name of Anthony Vaccarello debuted his first runway collection in Paris, it was Pecheux who created the makeup look backstage. “I started working with Anthony from day one and it’s always brought me a lot of joy,” he said. “Not only because he’s an amazing person, but because Anthony’s show was the first day of Paris fashion week, and we always started it off right with an insane and fun makeup look.” The feeling was mutual, and when Vaccarello was named creative director at Saint Laurent he brought Pecheux with him to do the makeup for his first collection. “From there, YSL Beauty approached me, and maybe Anthony put in a good word for me, and I said yes,” recalled Pecheux. “But what really made me decide to say yes was the fact that I met the team [at YSL Beauty] and I liked them very much—very, very much.”

And it’s not just Vaccarello who Pecheux shares an affinity with. Growing up in France in the ’60’s and ’70s, Pecheux watched Yves Saint Laurent’s career grow and his fame rise. “I grew up with Saint Laurent and his muses, it’s part of my culture, it’s like the English with The Beatles or the American with the Rolling Stones.” (Leave it to the French to have the fanciest of the cultural icons.) And like Saint Laurent, Pecheux loves a lot of glamour and even more amounts of sex appeal. (At Allure, we used to call his signature makeup look “naughty smoky eyes” if you catch my drift.) “Saint Laurent was chic and kind of decadent,” said Pecheux. “And while I’m not sure I can say I’m chic, I definitely have a decadent side to me and I like to break the rules.” Case in point: For Saint Laurent’s fall 2017 show, Pecheux smudged black mascara across the models’ eyes by rubbing his fingers over the wand of YSL Beauty’s The Shock Volumizing Mascara and smearing it across the brow bones.

Speaking of product, Pecheux is eager to dig in and better familiarize himself with the entire (and vast) range of YSL Beauty products, a few of which he’s already a big fan of. “Obviously there’s the Touche Éclat, which is such an amazing, multifunctional product, but the other day I was also trying out the new Touche Éclat Cushion and I was very impressed.” (The Cushion isn’t available yet in the U.S. but you can sign up to find out when it does by signing up for notifications on the YSL Beauty website.) Pecheux also loves the Le Teint Touche Éclat Foundation, which is saying a lot because anyone who knows Pecheux’s work knows that he hates foundation. “It has very nice coverage without feeling heavy,” he explained. “It reminds me of the Japanese formulas that have a satin finish but without that thickness or greasiness.” The brand’s lipsticks and eyebrow palettes have also caught his attention.

Pecheux’s story with YSL Beauty has only just begun. Over the coming months he will be busy developing new products and creating the makeup looks for the brand’s ad campaigns, and in September, he will return to where it all started, backstage at the Saint Laurent spring 2018 runway show in Paris. And he’ll be doing what he does best: Making the models look beautiful, being a little naughty, and doing it all with a laugh and a smile.


See Tom Pecheux in action backstage at the Victoria’s Secret show:

Article source: http://www.allure.com/story/tom-pecheux-yves-saint-laurent-beauty

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Get it while it’s hot

When Kylie Jenner opened her second pop-up cosmetics shop in New York City this February, fans flocked from across the country and waited as long as three days to be among the first inside her pink-hued boutique.

The hoopla was hardly surprising. The reality-TV and social-media star’s products tend to sell out online in a matter of minutes. And as companies endeavour to compete in an increasingly crowded market, Jenner’s success indicates a seismic shift in the beauty industry: Once driven by the belief that customers would commit to a shade for life, cosmetic brands are now relying on fleeting products to entice shoppers and cultivate demand. In beauty, as in fashion, novelty is the new loyalty.

Limited-edition products are certainly nothing unusual. Luxury brands such as Shu Uemura, Nars and M.A.C Cosmetics have been collaborating on one-off collections with celebrities and fashion houses for decades. Today, however, the beauty industry is awash with cutting-edge players taking a cue from fast fashion and shortening the production cycle to bring their goods to market more quickly and jump on trends as they emerge.

One such company is Netherlands-based Teeez Cosmetics, which landed at select Hudson’s Bay stores across Canada last year. Focusing on a continual rotation of short-run, fashion-inspired makeup, Teeez Cosmetics keeps four colour collections on counter, the eldest of which it replaces roughly every four months. While banking on a line that’s 90 per cent impermanent might have seemed implausible in pre-millennial times, it’s the only modus operandi Teeez Cosmetics has known. “We originally started in 2004 with just a limited-edition collection of lip glosses and nail polishes,” says Amanda Kruzich, acting Canadian marketing director at Teeez Cosmetics. “Customer loyalty is changing and I think millennials are a big part of that,” she adds. “They’re willing to be loyal to different brands, to be more experimental, and I think we’re really on the pulse of that.”

Catherine Masson, vice president of beauty at Shoppers Drug Mart, seconds the notion that customer needs can no longer be met by staple brands and products. “When we started Beauty Boutique in 2003, we were the first retailer in Canada to remove the counter and create an unbiased, open concept,” she says. “If you looked inside a customer’s makeup bag, even back in 2003, she had all different brands.”

Big companies are capitalizing on the 'fast beauty' phenomenon by acquiring nimbler brands.

Big companies are capitalizing on the ‘fast beauty’ phenomenon by acquiring nimbler brands.

To meet the growing demand for newness, Shoppers Drug Mart is looking more to trend-led products such as iN.gredients, a line of food-inspired face masks launching later this year from Toronto brand Look Beauty. “The inspiration came from my frequent visits to South Korea,” says Allan Lever, CEO of Look Beauty. “It seemed that every visit, there was something new on the shelves. We have HM and Zara bringing new [clothing] styles to market every week, and our aim is to do the same by delivering new [beauty] releases based on trending ingredients and seasonal offerings.” Thanks, in part, to its streamlined business model and established network of South Korean factories, Look Beauty can launch a product in as little as four months – more than three times faster than the industry average. “The big beauty companies just can’t move as quickly to jump on the hottest trends,” says Lever.

“We all know that being first to market can put brands in a winning position,” says Sarah Jindal, a senior beauty analyst at Mintel. “Larger, more traditional brands need to learn from the smaller guys and bring more of their flexibility and innovative spirit to the game.”

Big companies are capitalizing on the “fast beauty” phenomenon by acquiring nimbler brands. Last November, Estée Lauder purchased Too Faced for $1.45-billion. L’Oréal spent a reported $500-million buying NYX Cosmetics in 2014. With an agile development model and cult following of beauty addicts and professional makeup artists, NYX leveraged its broadened international reach to boost sales by 400 per cent in 2016.

Meanwhile, Korean cosmetics giant the Face Shop has engineered its own fast-paced production cycle while expanding its global presence to more than 2,600 stores in 29 countries. “Stores like Sephora have the advantage of catering to customers’ ever-changing needs by offering a variety of brands, but the Face Shop does not,” says Sean Lee, a member of the company’s global marketing team. “Launching new products is no longer a choice; it is a must for us,” he adds. “We have to achieve continuous product development and innovation in order to satisfy consumers and keep up with market trends.”

To stay at the forefront of a hyper-competitive market, the Face Shop constantly assesses the performance of each item. “Once we identify that products are not performing to our expectations, we stop production and discontinue the product,” says Lee. As for timelines, “When everything is working out smoothly and correctly, we can launch a new product as fast as in one month.”

Consumer demand shows no sign of slowing down, but while beauty brands are eager to keep up, they should remain wary of comparisons to fast fashion. “This idea of trend-driven products that are accessible to a broad base of consumers is appealing to brands,” says Jindal of Mintel. “There can be pitfalls, however, especially in a time of rising eco-consciousness and concern over the safety of products and ingredients.”

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Article source: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/fashion-and-beauty/beauty/cosmetics-companies-take-cues-from-fast-fashion-to-findsuccess/article34360651/

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Coty appoints Adam & Eve/DDB for Max Factor global creative account



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Article source: http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/coty-appoints-adam-eve-ddb-max-factor-global-creative-account/1427889

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Liquid foundation market forecasts to 2021 available in new report

Consumer Luxury Goods Market Research News

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WhaTech Channel: Consumer Market Research

Published: 19 March 2017

Submitted by RNR Market Research. WhaTech Agency

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Foundation is a skin colored makeup applied to the face to create an even, uniform color to the complexion, to cover flaws and, sometimes, to change the natural skintone.

- Agency -.

The Liquid Foundation Market report titled “Global Liquid Foundation Market by Manufacturers, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2021” explores key regions, with sales, revenue and Liquid Foundation Market share by key countries in these regions. 

Liquid Foundation Market report explores almost every hydraulic system contains more than one hydraulic filter. This report focuses on the Liquid Foundation in Global market, especially in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa.

- Agency -.

This report categorizes the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application.

Browse 115 Pages report, Key Manufacturers and Regions @ www.reportsnreports.com/contacts/discount.aspx?name=773141 .

Many colors and types of Liquid Foundation exist. As with most other types of makeup, Liquid Foundation is typically, but not exclusively, which worn by women.

The use of Liquid Foundation dates back to medieval times.

Liquid Foundation is a key part of any womans makeup collection and even for women who arent as heavily into makeup usually owns at least two or three Liquid Foundations. There are many different types of Liquid Foundations out on the market such as sheer, light, medium full coverage.

Depending on where someone is going, what kind of day it is, or what kind of person someone is really decides what kind of Liquid Foundation they prefer.

Liquid Foundation Market Segment by Manufacturers, this report covers

L’ORéAL, KIKO, ESTEE LAUDER, LVMH, REVLON, Christian Dior, Chanel, AMORE PACIFIC, SHISEIDO, PG, JohnsonJohnson, Kao, POLA, Walgreens Boots Alliance, Laura Mercier, KOSé, AVON, Stylenanda, Elizabeth Arden, Burberry.

Liquid Foundation Market Segment by Regions, regional analysis covers

North America (USA, Canada and Mexico)

Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy)

Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia)

South America, Middle East and Africa

Get a Copy @ www.reportsnreports.com/purchase.aspx?name=773141 .

Liquid Foundation Market Segment by Type, covers

Sheer

Light

Medium

Full

Liquid Foundation Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into

10 to 20

20 to 30

30 to 40

40 to 50

Above 50

There are 13 Chapters to deeply display the global Liquid Foundation market.

Chapter 1, to describe Liquid Foundation Introduction, product scope, market overview, market opportunities, market risk, market driving force;

Chapter 2, to analyze the top manufacturers of Liquid Foundation, with sales, revenue, and price of Liquid Foundation, in 2015 and 2016;

Chapter 3, to display the competitive situation among the top manufacturers, with sales, revenue and market share in 2015 and 2016;

Chapter 4, to show the global market by regions, with sales, revenue and market share of Liquid Foundation, for each region, from 2011 to 2016;

Chapter 5, 6, 7 and 8, to analyze the key regions, with sales, revenue and market share by key countries in these regions;

Chapter 9 and 10, to show the market by type and application, with sales market share and growth rate by type, application, from 2011 to 2016;

Chapter 11, Liquid Foundation market forecast, by regions, type and application, with sales and revenue, from 2016 to 2021;

Chapter 12 and 13, to describe Liquid Foundation sales channel, distributors, traders, dealers, appendix and data source.

Get Sample Copy @ www.reportsnreports.com/contacts/requestsample.aspx?name=773141 .

List of Tables and Figures

Figure Liquid Foundation Picture

Figure Global Sales Market Share of Liquid Foundation by Types in 2015

Table Liquid Foundation Types for Major Manufacturers

Figure Sheer Picture

Figure Light Picture

Figure Medium Picture

Table Liquid Foundation Sales Market Share by Applications in 2015

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Article source: https://www.whatech.com/market-research/consumer/276709-liquid-foundation-market-forecasts-to-2021-available-in-new-report

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