Estée Lauder, L’Oreal and Revlon Persue Growing Consumer Markets in Asia – Mergers & Acquisitions

Recent acquisitions of beauty product distributors include Elizabeth Arden, Have Be along and IT Cosmetics


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Skincare products and services represent a growing industry in Asia as the middle class expands throughout the region. Beauty conglomerates headquartered in the U.S. and Europe are responding quickly, sealing MA deals to reach the new customers.

Estée Lauder Cos. (NYSE: EL), headquartered in New York, completed its investment in Have Be Co. in December. Based in Seoul, South Korea, Have Be sells moisturizers and cleansers that are sold in the U.S. and Asia under the Dr. Jart+ and Do The Right Thing brands. Estée Lauder is interested in expanding some of its other brands in Korea too. The company said that it launched Glamglow in Korea earlier in 2016. Estée Lauder completed the acquisition of the Hollywood, California-based facial mask maker in January 2015 for an undisclosed amount.

Beauty balms and blemish balms, known as BB creams, are popular in South Korea and have also been gaining adoption in North America. BB creams are typically sold as all all-in-one products that combine moisturizer, sunblock and foundation.

Competitors, including L’Oreal SA and Revlon Inc.(NYSE: REV), have been buying skincare distributors with either significant presence in Asia, or plans to develop one. Paris-based L’Oreal SA agreed in July to acquire IT Cosmetics from TSG Consumer Partners for $1.2 billion. Jersey City, New Jersey-based IT Cosmetics has plans to expand in additional Sephora retail stores in the U.S. and Asia. IT Cosmetics sells makeup and anti-aging creams. L’Oreal has made deals in Asia before. In 2014, L’Oréal bought China-based facial mask producer Magic Holdings International Ltd.

In June, New York-based Revlon reached a deal to buy Elizabeth Arden Inc. (Nasdaq: RDEN) for $870 million. Revlon said the acquisition will put it in a better position to compete globally, particularly in Asia. In 2015, Elizabeth Arden announced a joint venture deal with beauty products distributor Luxasia Ventures as part of its efforts to boost the company’s presence in the region. Elizabeth Arden, located in New York, is known for its skincare, cosmetics and fragrance brands.

Consumers around the world are constantly looking for new ways to care for their skin, and that will drive up demand for skincare producers.

For more information on related topics, visit the following:

  • Strategic Buyers
  • Consumer Goods/Retail

Article source: http://www.themiddlemarket.com/news/consumer_goods_retail/est195169e-lauder-loreal-and-revlon-persue-growing-consumer-markets-in-asia-261378-1.html

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10 Best Micellar Waters

Models swear by them, every make-up artist has one in their kit and with their no-rinse, gentle and easy-to-use formulas they’re perfect for travelling and late nights. But what are micellar waters and why are they so special?

Micellar waters first gained momentum in Paris, a city whose skin-conscious inhabitants welcomed the opportunity to swerve the bad effects that the famously hard Parisian water had on their skin. Designed to be swept away with a cotton pad rather than rinsed off, micellar water is made up of cleansing micelle particles suspended in soft water. These tiny oil particles draw make-up (including waterproof mascara), sebum and impurities from the skin without the need for harsh chemicals – no wonder they’re a must backstage at the shows. For everyday cleansing there is no match for a thorough and tailored regime, but as a first step to remove make-up or an option when you don’t have easy access to water, micellar waters are a great solution for clean skin in record time.

Unsurprisingly, the French have the market well and truly in the palm of their hand, with some of the best formulas originating from key pharmacy brands such as La Roche-Posay, Bioderma and Avène. See the 10 best micellar waters here.

Article source: http://www.vogue.co.uk/gallery/best-micellar-water-reviews-taaj-loreal-bioderma

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Estée Lauder, L’Oreal and Revlon Persue Growing Consumer … – Mergers & Acquisitions

Recent acquisitions of beauty product distributors include Elizabeth Arden, Have Be along and IT Cosmetics


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Skincare products and services represent a growing industry in Asia as the middle class expands throughout the region. Beauty conglomerates headquartered in the U.S. and Europe are responding quickly, sealing MA deals to reach the new customers.

Estée Lauder Cos. (NYSE: EL), headquartered in New York, completed its investment in Have Be Co. in December. Based in Seoul, South Korea, Have Be sells moisturizers and cleansers that are sold in the U.S. and Asia under the Dr. Jart+ and Do The Right Thing brands. Estée Lauder is interested in expanding some of its other brands in Korea too. The company said that it launched Glamglow in Korea earlier in 2016. Estée Lauder completed the acquisition of the Hollywood, California-based facial mask maker in January 2015 for an undisclosed amount.

Beauty balms and blemish balms, known as BB creams, are popular in South Korea and have also been gaining adoption in North America. BB creams are typically sold as all all-in-one products that combine moisturizer, sunblock and foundation.

Competitors, including L’Oreal SA and Revlon Inc.(NYSE: REV), have been buying skincare distributors with either significant presence in Asia, or plans to develop one. Paris-based L’Oreal SA agreed in July to acquire IT Cosmetics from TSG Consumer Partners for $1.2 billion. Jersey City, New Jersey-based IT Cosmetics has plans to expand in additional Sephora retail stores in the U.S. and Asia. IT Cosmetics sells makeup and anti-aging creams. L’Oreal has made deals in Asia before. In 2014, L’Oréal bought China-based facial mask producer Magic Holdings International Ltd.

In June, New York-based Revlon reached a deal to buy Elizabeth Arden Inc. (Nasdaq: RDEN) for $870 million. Revlon said the acquisition will put it in a better position to compete globally, particularly in Asia. In 2015, Elizabeth Arden announced a joint venture deal with beauty products distributor Luxasia Ventures as part of its efforts to boost the company’s presence in the region. Elizabeth Arden, located in New York, is known for its skincare, cosmetics and fragrance brands.

Consumers around the world are constantly looking for new ways to care for their skin, and that will drive up demand for skincare producers.

For more information on related topics, visit the following:

  • Strategic Buyers
  • Consumer Goods/Retail

Article source: http://www.themiddlemarket.com/news/consumer_goods_retail/est195169e-lauder-loreal-and-revlon-persue-growing-consumer-markets-in-asia-261378-1.html

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How To Exfoliate Without Microbeads

Microbeads are bad news. If you aren’t familiar with the issue, the basic problem is that those tiny plastic spheres found in exfoliating scrubs and other beauty products are small enough that they can pass through water filtration systems, and ultimately end up in the stomachs of marine life (and if you eat fish, in your stomach too). Microbeads are already banned in the United States and now Greenpeace’s campaign to see the back of them is gaining momentum, with companies such as L’Oréal and Estée Lauder promising to phase them out over the coming years. In August 2016, British MPs called for a worldwide ban on the use of microbeads in cosmetics.

“Hundreds of thousands of people want the Government to ban microbeads, scientists are warning of the damage they’re causing to the environment, and this cross-party report echoes both,” says Greenpeace senior oceans campaigner Louise Edge. “This is a time of huge uncertainty in the UK – not least for the protection of our environment – but Theresa May’s Government has a unique opportunity to protect both consumers and our oceans by banning microbeads from any household product which could go down the drain and into our seas.”

But why wait until then? There’s no reason why your cleansing regime should take the hit, and there are plenty of ways to exfoliate without the use of microbeads. AHAs and BHAs (read more on those in the Vogue Skincare Alphabet) offer effective chemical exfoliation, while clever cleansing devices ensure you get the deep-clean effect without the need for manual scrubbing. And if you can’t let go of the feel of a good scrub-down just yet, plenty of companies offer natural alternatives, from ground apricot kernels and seeds to rice powder or clay. See eight ways to reveal a brighter complexion without the plastic here.

Article source: http://www.vogue.co.uk/gallery/how-to-exfoliate-without-microbeads

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Beware the microbead killer

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Article source: http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/microbeads-plastic-particles-in-cosmetic-products-are-flushed-into-rivers-and-seas-threatening-marine-life/news-story/0f9fbc88eae0ef8ac1c925c832139056

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Estée Lauder, L’Oreal along with Revlon Eye Growing Consumer Markets in Asia – Mergers & Acquisitions

Recent acquisitions of beauty product distributors include Elizabeth Arden, Have Be along and IT Cosmetics


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Skincare products and services represent a growing industry in Asia as the middle class expands throughout the region. Beauty conglomerates headquartered in the U.S. and Europe are responding quickly, sealing MA deals to reach the new customers.

Estée Lauder Cos. (NYSE: EL), headquartered in New York, completed its investment in Have Be Co. in December. Based in Seoul, South Korea, Have Be sells moisturizers and cleansers that are sold in the U.S. and Asia under the Dr. Jart+ and Do The Right Thing brands. Estée Lauder is interested in expanding some of its other brands in Korea too. The company said that it launched Glamglow in Korea earlier in 2016. Estée Lauder completed the acquisition of the Hollywood, California-based facial mask maker in January 2015 for an undisclosed amount.

Beauty balms and blemish balms, known as BB creams, are popular in South Korea and have also been gaining adoption in North America. BB creams are typically sold as all all-in-one products that combine moisturizer, sunblock and foundation.

Competitors, including L’Oreal SA and Revlon Inc.(NYSE: REV), have been buying skincare distributors with either significant presence in Asia, or plans to develop one. Paris-based L’Oreal SA agreed in July to acquire IT Cosmetics from TSG Consumer Partners for $1.2 billion. Jersey City, New Jersey-based IT Cosmetics has plans to expand in additional Sephora retail stores in the U.S. and Asia. IT Cosmetics sells makeup and anti-aging creams. L’Oreal has made deals in Asia before. In 2014, L’Oréal bought China-based facial mask producer Magic Holdings International Ltd.

In June, New York-based Revlon reached a deal to buy Elizabeth Arden Inc. (Nasdaq: RDEN) for $870 million. Revlon said the acquisition will put it in a better position to compete globally, particularly in Asia. In 2015, Elizabeth Arden announced a joint venture deal with beauty products distributor Luxasia Ventures as part of its efforts to boost the company’s presence in the region. Elizabeth Arden, located in New York, is known for its skincare, cosmetics and fragrance brands.

Consumers around the world are constantly looking for new ways to care for their skin, and that will drive up demand for skincare producers.

For more information on related topics, visit the following:

  • Strategic Buyers
  • Consumer Goods/Retail

Article source: http://www.themiddlemarket.com/news/consumer_goods_retail/est195169e-lauder-loreal-and-revlon-eye-growing-consumer--261378-1.html

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Estée Lauder, L’Oreal, and Revlon Eye Growing Consumer Markets in Asia – Mergers & Acquisitions

Recent acquisitions of beauty product distributors include Elizabeth Arden, Have Be and IT Cosmetics


Print

Email

Reprints

Comments


Skincare products and services represent a growing industry in Asia as the middle class expands throughout the region. Beauty conglomerates headquartered in the U.S. and Europe are responding quickly, sealing MA deals to reach the new customers.

Estée Lauder Cos. (NYSE: EL), headquartered in New York, completed its investment in Have Be Co. in December. Based in Seoul, South Korea, Have Be sells moisturizers and cleansers that are sold in the U.S. and Asia under the Dr. Jart+ and Do The Right Thing brands. Estée Lauder is interested in expanding some of its other brands in Korea too. The company said that it launched Glamglow in Korea earlier in 2016. Estée Lauder completed the acquisition of the Hollywood, California-based facial mask maker in January 2015 for an undisclosed amount.

Beauty balms and blemish balms, known as BB creams, are popular in South Korea and have also been gaining adoption in North America. BB creams are typically sold as all all-in-one products that combine moisturizer, sunblock and foundation.

Competitors, including L’Oreal SA and Revlon Inc.(NYSE: REV), have been buying skincare distributors with either significant presence in Asia, or plans to develop one. Paris-based L’Oreal SA agreed in July to acquire IT Cosmetics from TSG Consumer Partners for $1.2 billion. Jersey City, New Jersey-based IT Cosmetics has plans to expand in additional Sephora retail stores in the U.S. and Asia. IT Cosmetics sells makeup and anti-aging creams. L’Oreal has made deals in Asia before. In 2014, L’Oréal bought China-based facial mask producer Magic Holdings International Ltd.

In June, New York-based Revlon reached a deal to buy Elizabeth Arden Inc. (Nasdaq: RDEN) for $870 million. Revlon said the acquisition will put it in a better position to compete globally, particularly in Asia. In 2015, Elizabeth Arden announced a joint venture deal with beauty products distributor Luxasia Ventures as part of its efforts to boost the company’s presence in the region. Elizabeth Arden, located in New York, is known for its skincare, cosmetics and fragrance brands.

Consumers around the world are constantly looking for new ways to care for their skin, and that will drive up demand for skincare producers.

For more information on related topics, visit the following:

  • Strategic Buyers
  • Consumer Goods/Retail

Article source: http://www.themiddlemarket.com/news/consumer_goods_retail/est195169e-lauder-loreal-and-revlon-eye-growing-consumer--261378-1.html

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France’s L’Occitane expands its ambitions in Asia

HONG KONG The tranquil towns of Provence in the south of France, depicted in Vincent Van Gogh’s paintings surrounded by almond blossoms, might seem a far cry from the hustle and bustle of Asian capitals, with their digital-savvy residents. But distance and the change of scene are minor hurdles for L’Occitane, the premium French beauty brand, which is gearing up for growth in the region with a digital drive.

In mid-September, L’Occitane is turning its flagship store in Tokyo’s commercial hub of Shinjuku into what it calls its first digital store, which fuses digital and physical shopping spaces.

The Digital Provence Theater, produced by teamLab, is to appear in L’Occitane’s store in Shinjuku, Tokyo, in September. (Photo courtesy of L’Occitane)

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The Digital Provence Theater, produced by teamLab, is to appear in L’Occitane’s store in Shinjuku, Tokyo, in September. (Photo courtesy of L’Occitane)

An interactive “flower table” will feature the kind of natural ingredients L’Occitane uses in its products. In a digital theater, customers will be able to take a virtual walk into purple lavender fields under the Mediterranean sun and end their shopping trip by tasting a delicacy of the French south — blueberry-lavender creme brulee, or burnt cream in a cone.

Andre Hoffmann, executive director, vice-chairman and managing director of L’Occitane, displays new face care products to be launched in September.

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Andre Hoffmann, executive director, vice-chairman and managing director of L’Occitane, displays new face care products to be launched in September.

“We want to bring nature to downtown Shinjuku,” Andre Hoffmann, L’Occitane’s vice chairman and managing director for Asia-Pacific, told the Nikkei Asian Review. “We feel this will be kind of a showstopper that will bring people into the store.”

The digital store is just one of L’Occitane’s latest moves to boost sales in Japan, its largest market in Asia by net sales. The 40-year-old brick-and-mortar retailer has a more ambitious target to meet — more than doubling its e-commerce sales to a quarter of its global sales by 2020, up from around 10% today.

The French company sells more hand creams and shower gels in the Far East than at home. Even though it is still based in France, its shares are only traded in Hong Kong, and Asia contributes to about half of its turnover while Europe, North America and emerging economies like Brazil and Russia account for the rest. This is unlike rivals such as Origins, by U.S. cosmetics group Estee Lauder, and L’Oreal’s Body Shop, which have a less concentrated geographic presence.

L’Occitane generates about half of its revenue in Asia, including Hong Kong where it lists its shares. The outlet in Festival Walk, a mall in Kowloon Tong. (Photo by Jennifer Lo)

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L’Occitane generates about half of its revenue in Asia, including Hong Kong where it lists its shares. The outlet in Festival Walk, a mall in Kowloon Tong. (Photo by Jennifer Lo)

L’Occitane’s e-commerce push comes at a time when the global retail industry is at an inflection point. Traditional markets like Europe are losing steam. Deep-pocketed Chinese mainlanders are tightening their belts. A new breed of customers in Asia are doing their shopping with just a few clicks on their smartphones, whether it is on the train or in the bathtub.

The group’s net profit for the year ended in March fell 9.6% to 113.6 million euros ($128 million) compared with a year earlier, despite a modest rise in turnover. But quarterly sales from April to June softened by 2.2% to 268 million euros, dragged lower by foreign exchange losses and uncertainty over the global economy.

HEALTHY E-COMMERCE GLOW Still, a localized e-commerce strategy has been an engine for growth. L’Occitane is tapping into Asia’s messaging apps such as Line, a unit of South Korean internet group Naver, to reach out to customers and promote its products in Japan. It is ranked one of the top gifting brands on chat app KakaoTalk, which alongside L’Occitane’s own official site and third-party platforms, accounts for 25% of its sales in South Korea.

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In other developed markets like the U.S. and the U.K., about 20% of the group’s retail sales come from e-commerce, primarily through direct sales on its website. That figure falls to about 10% in Japan and mainland China. However, overall global sales on L’Occitane’s branded e-commerce channels rose by about 15% last year, overtaking the sales growth in physical stores.

In December 2014, the group began a partnership with China’s Tmall, an online platform for branded goods operated by Alibaba Group Holding, to penetrate areas without any dedicated L’Occitane shops. It is planning more exclusive launches on Tmall and will start selling directly on WeChat, China’s hugely popular messaging app developed by Tencent Holdings, later this year.

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Many have sounded the death knell for physical stores in the era of digital e-commerce, but L’Occitane is unconvinced. Existing store renovation and new openings still play a part in building brand awareness. The group has 195 physical stores in 75 cities across China excluding Hong Kong, but plans to add more. This was despite shop closures by Western peers like Louis Vuitton and Gucci as China’s wider economic downturn and the anti-corruption drive led by President Xi Jinping stifled consumption.

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“So you have to be very selective,” said Hoffmann, justifying his enduring confidence in physical stores. The group will slow down its expansion in major cities like Beijing and Shanghai but continue to enter lower-tier cities where he believes there is room to grow over time.

Hoffmann talks of a learning curve for customers: A typical consumer in an emerging market starts out buying make-up products like lipstick and foundation, with facial care their primary concern. Then he or she will move on to body care and toiletries like body washes and hair products, which have been a bigger focus for the group. “As they start to shift, we believe our revenue will grow up in those stores in third-tier cities,” he added.

L’Occitane is also expanding in Southeast Asia. With close to 80 stores in countries like Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines, the group is riding on the region’s burgeoning middle class whose appetite for branded goods is rising. By the end of this year, it is opening its third boutiques in both Myanmar and Cambodia with local partners. In South Asia, the group will launch its first shops in Sri Lanka and Pakistan later this year.

South and Southeast Asia are “not a small part of our business,” said Hoffmann, referring to a revenue split of 25% for South Asia and 75% for North Asia. “They’re small markets today, but they are important markets.”

INDIAN CONUNDRUM India is a notable exception, however. The world’s second-most populous country should be an ideal market for retail business, but many global beauty brands have had a hard time there. L’Occitane has about 10 stores in cities including New Delhi, Mumbai and Kolkata, but its scale has lagged behind markets of comparable size. “It’s no comparison [with China]. India still has a lot of room to catch up,” said Hoffmann.

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One reason is that heavy duties on foreign goods have prompted Indian consumers to shop elsewhere, such as in Dubai and Bangladesh. Others would rather buy products in bulk from local brands.

While the premium sector remains small in India, L’Occitane stresses the strategic importance of remaining in the market. “In the long term … any country with more than a billion people has to be a market where you would want to be present,” said Hoffmann, adding that the group would like to accelerate its investment there if market rules change.

Despite its sprawling sales network, L’Occitane’s stock performance tells a different story. The retailer’s nearly $3 billion market capitalization is still dwarfed by the $109.6 billion of market leader L’Oreal and that of regional beauty rivals, including the $10.9 billion of South Korea’s AmorePacific Group.

In 2010, L’Occitane became the first French company to list on the Hong Kong stock exchange with a $700 million initial public offering — a move that prompted global consumer brands like Prada and luggage retailer Samsonite to follow suit. Today, however, its shares are barely above its IPO level. In fact, they have lost about 13% from a year ago, underperforming a 2% gain of Hong Kong’s benchmark Hang Seng Index.

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Recent volatility in L’Occitane’s stock price led to a wave of analyst downgrades. Credit Suisse cut its rating to “underperform” in July, citing a “deeply challenged” outlook and sluggish quarterly sales.

CLSA slammed the stock with a “sell.” Mariana Kou, a consumer analyst at the brokerage, attributed its underperformance to a single-brand focus and hefty investment required for diversifying its flagship L’Occitane brand. Marketing expenses rose 23% last year and about one in 10 dollars from its net sales was spent on promotion.

The group has stepped up efforts to promote newer brands like Melvita and L’Occitane au Bresil — a more affordable brand targeting the average Brazilian consumer. By 2020, it expects emerging brands to account for 10-15% of its overall sales. Calling the target achievable, CLSA’s Kou said: “I wouldn’t be too worried about over-investment into e-commerce, but [rather] the margin pressure coming from growing the smaller brands.”

EURO ISSUES A weaker euro could well be a catalyst for L’Occitane, which has the bulk of its production costs denominated in the currency, but which generates most of its revenue overseas. Currency swings after the U.K.’s June referendum vote to leave the European Union have also complicated its pricing strategies elsewhere.

Asked about the impact of a stronger yen after Brexit, Hoffmann said the group has been cautious about a pricing adjustment in Japan so as to uphold its brand image. “It’s very hard to yo-yo,” he said. It is not only that cutting prices may hurt the “premiumness” in Japan; raising prices once the currency weakens is also difficult. “There is not yet inflation in Japan where customers can easily accept strong pricing increases.”

Others are slightly more bullish about the group’s longer-term prospects. “Keep in mind that with all the macro headwinds like Brexit, nobody did well. I don’t expect L’Occitane to be immune to these things given its global play,” said Jamie Soo, an analyst at Daiwa Capital Markets. “Its three-part strategy — store revitalization, e-commerce and growth of its emerging brands — is how we’ll see growth kicking in the next few years for L’Occitane’s top line,” he added.

Meanwhile in Tokyo, the finishing touches are being put on the digital store. L’Occitane hopes that the revitalization project will increase foot traffic by double digits and bring the new breed of millennial customers, born between 1980 and 2000, closer to the brand.

“Millennials tend to select or deselect the information they read. They don’t want to waste time reading about things they deselect, but will go deep into the topics they do select,” said Kazuki Nishiguchi, the group’s president in Japan.

And that is not all. L’Occitane said it could roll out its digital store across Asia, depending on market reaction in Tokyo. The group would not reveal how much was spent on the store, but said that with a smaller investment, it could start to place virtual reality headsets in Asian stores.

“The beauty of digital is that it can be reproduced easily,” said Nishiguchi.

If that happens, Asian consumers across the region could soon be sampling a fragrant virtual experience of Provence.

Nikkei deputy editor Ken Moriyasu in Tokyo contributed to this story.

Article source: http://asia.nikkei.com/magazine/20160825-ASIA-S-SILVER-LINING/Business/France-s-L-Occitane-expands-its-ambitions-in-Asia

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8 Reasons your foundation looks bad

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Article source: http://www.cosmopolitan.com.au/beauty/makeup/2016/8/eight-reasons-your-foundation-looks-bad/

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Global Organic Skincare Products Market 2016-2020 – New Market Research Report

Fast Market Research announces the availability of the new TechNavio report, “Global Organic Skincare Products Market 2016-2020″, on their comprehensive research portal

This press release was orginally distributed by SBWire

Boston, MA — (SBWIRE) — 08/23/2016 — Organic skin care products tend to have a shorter shelf life as they do not contain preservatives, and generally last less than a year. Manufacturers are investing in the development of product formulations that allow longer shelf lives in order to meet customer expectations. For instance, Zkin Organics has formulated a unique product by blending five natural ingredients that last for 18 months without airless pump technology.

Technavio’s analysts forecast the global organic skin care products market to grow at a CAGR of 10.18% during the period 2016-2020.

Covered in this report

The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global organic skin care products market for 2016-2020. To calculate the market size, the report considers the revenue generated through the retail sales of organic skin care products to individual customers.

The market is divided into the following segments based on geography:

Get More Details on this Report and a Full Table of Contents at Global Organic Skincare Products Market 2016-2020

-APAC
-Europe
-North America
-ROW

Technavio’s report, Global Organic Skin Care Products Market 2016-2020, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market.

Key vendors

-Beiersdorf
-Estee Lauder
-L’Oreal
-Shiseido
-The Clorox Company

Other prominent vendors

-Amway
-Arbonne International
-Aubrey Organics
-Colomer
-Colorganics
-Esse Organic Skincare
-Gabriel Cosmetics
-Giovanni Cosmetics
-Iredale Mineral Cosmetics
-L’Occitane en Provence
-Natura Cosmeticos
-The Hain Celestial Group
-Yves Rocher

Market driver

-Demand for products free from chemicals
-For a full, detailed list, view our report

Market challenge

-Challenges in product packaging and differentiation
-For a full, detailed list, view our report

Market trend

-Rising need for organic anti-aging products
-For a full, detailed list, view our report

Key questions answered in this report

-What will the market size be in 2020 and what will the growth rate be?
-What are the key market trends?
-What is driving this market?
-What are the challenges to market growth?
-Who are the key vendors in this market space?
-What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors?
-What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors?

You can request one free hour of our analyst’s time when you purchase this market report. Details are provided within the report.

Companies Mentioned in this Report: Beiersdorf, , Estee Lauder, , L’Oreal, , Shiseido, , The Clorox Company, , Amway, , Arbonne International, , Aubrey Organics, , Colomer, , Colorganics, , Esse Organic Skincare, , Gabriel Cosmetics, , Giovanni Cosmetics, , Iredale Mineral Cosmetics, , L’Occitane en Provence, , Natura Cosmeticos, , The Hain Celestial, , Yves Rocher.

About Fast Market Research
Fast Market Research is a leading distributor of market research and business information. Representing the world’s top research publishers and analysts, we provide quick and easy access to the best competitive intelligence available. Our unbiased, expert staff is always available to help you find the right research to fit your requirements and your budget. For more information about these or related research reports, please visit our website at http://www.fastmr.com or call us at 1.800.844.8156.

Browse all Consumer Goods research reports at Fast Market Research

You may also be interested in these related reports:
-Global Organic Personal Care Products Market 2015-2019
-Global Professional Skincare Market 2015-2019
-Global Skincare Market 2016-2020
-Global Organic Laundry Detergents Market 2016-2020
-Global Bath and Shower Products Market 2015-2019

For more information on this press release visit: http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/global-organic-skincare-products-market-2016-2020-new-716358.htm

Article source: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/3048154

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